Chapter 23. Refractory-Ceramic-Fiber Composites: Progress, Needs, and Opportunities

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. R. W. Rice,
  2. C. V. Matt,
  3. W. J. McDonough,
  4. K. R. McKinney and
  5. C. C. Wu

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470318782.ch23

Proceedings of the 6th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 3, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 6th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 3, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Rice, R. W., Matt, C. V., McDonough, W. J., McKinney, K. R. and Wu, C. C. (1982) Refractory-Ceramic-Fiber Composites: Progress, Needs, and Opportunities, in Proceedings of the 6th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 3, Issue 9/10 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470318782.ch23

Author Information

  1. Naval Research Lab Washington, D.C. 20375

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1982

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470373972

Online ISBN: 9780470318782

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Keywords:

  • hazardous;
  • porcelain enamel;
  • feasible solutions;
  • toxicity;
  • waste-treatment plant

Summary

The present paper discusses some of the general progress and problems in making ceramic-fiber composites that consist of a refractory ceramic (nonglass-based) matrix and ceramic fibers. Although much work remains to be done, substantial opportunity is demonstrated by achievement of room-temperature flexural strengths >300 000 kPa (>40 000 psi) with fracture toughnesses at least in the 10- to 20-MPam1/2 range for crack propagation nominally perpendicular to the unidirectional fiber direction. Some of the difficulties and a possible solution to problems of measuring fracture toughness of such materials are illustrated. The challenges of processing ceramic composites with existing ceramic fibers are discussed. Then, the needs and opportunities for more compatible composite systems are cited. Developing fibers of different compositions is cited as a particularly important need and opportunity to broaden the scope of ceramic-fiber composites.