Chapter 11. Refractory Dolomite Raw Materials

  1. William Smothers
  1. T. A. Clancy1 and
  2. D. J. Benson2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470318812.ch11

Proceedings of the Raw Materials for Refractories Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 1/2

Proceedings of the Raw Materials for Refractories Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Clancy, T. A. and Benson, D. J. (1983) Refractory Dolomite Raw Materials, in Proceedings of the Raw Materials for Refractories Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 1/2 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470318812.ch11

Author Information

  1. 1

    U. S. Bureau of Mines, Tuscaloosa Research Center University, AL 35486

  2. 2

    University of Alabama University, AL 35486

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1983

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374009

Online ISBN: 9780470318812

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Keywords:

  • dolomitic;
  • microstructure;
  • hypersaline;
  • magnesium;
  • microstructure

Summary

As one of its goals to reduce the nation's dependence on imported strategic and critical minerals, the U. S. Bureau of Mines is conducting research to encourage the use of plentiful domestic dolomitic resources. Greater use of our dolomite materials in a variety of refractory processes could reduce our dependence on imported FeCr2O4 and more expensive seawater periclase. A review of the literature on dolomite refractories has indicated that the U. S. has traditionally used less dolomite refractories than European countries. Characterization studies of 14 domestic dolomite ores–which included chemical and mineralogical analyses, density and hydration determinations, and microstructure and thermal decomposition evaluations–have shown that there were noticeable differences in the hydration, microstructure, and thermal behavior of the various ores.