Chapter 14. Recycled Materials for Refractories

  1. William Smothers
  1. D. E. Wittmer and
  2. A. V. Petty Jr.

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470318812.ch14

Proceedings of the Raw Materials for Refractories Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 1/2

Proceedings of the Raw Materials for Refractories Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Wittmer, D. E. and Petty, A. V. (1983) Recycled Materials for Refractories, in Proceedings of the Raw Materials for Refractories Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 1/2 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470318812.ch14

Author Information

  1. U. S. Bureau of Mines, Tuscaloosa Research Center University, AL 35486

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1983

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374009

Online ISBN: 9780470318812

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Keywords:

  • synthetic;
  • aluminum;
  • decarburization;
  • refractories;
  • copper

Summary

A major goal of the U. S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, is to investigate technology that can reduce the nation's dependence on strategic and critical imported raw materials. To this end, the Tuscaloosa Research Center has been involved in a program to investigate the potential of utilizing waste materials to produce refractories containing FeCr2O4 and Al2O3 Magnesite-chrome brick have been produced by recycling steel-plant waste refractories using conventional beneficiation techniques. In addition, preliminary evaluation of a synthetic high Al2O3 material as a refractory-grade bauxite substitute produced from aluminum dross appears promising. Currently, some high Al2O3 refractory waste materials are being used in commercial refractories and demand is increasing for recycled refractories.