Chapter 7. Experimental Evaluation of NOx Control Using a Glass-Tank Simulator

  1. William Smothers
  1. Hamid A. Abbasi1,
  2. Mark J. Khinkis1,
  3. Richard T. Waibel1 and
  4. William D. Boyd2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470318829.ch7

Proceedings of the 43rd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 3/4

Proceedings of the 43rd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 3/4

How to Cite

Abbasi, H. A., Khinkis, M. J., Waibel, R. T. and Boyd, W. D. (1983) Experimental Evaluation of NOx Control Using a Glass-Tank Simulator, in Proceedings of the 43rd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 3/4 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470318829.ch7

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Gas Technology 3424 S. State St., Chicago, IL 60616

  2. 2

    Southern California Gas Co. 800 Flower St., Los Angeles, CA 90017

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1983

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374016

Online ISBN: 9780470318829

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Keywords:

  • conducted;
  • container-glass;
  • glassmelters;
  • recirculation;
  • combustion

Summary

The present paper discusses the results of tests conducted on a A-scale glass-melter firing port to determine the effects of various burner operating parameters on NOx-emission levels. The burner port was designed for a firing rate of 1 MW (3 million Btu/h) in consultation with a container-glass manufacturer and was tested on a pilot-scale furnace. The furnace was operated at temperatures generally found in glassmelters (1430° to 1570°C (2600° to 2850°F)). The furnace temperature was adjusted using water-cooling tubes as a load. We investigated combustion-air preheat temperature (900° to 1200°C (1600° to 2200°F)), air/fuel ratio (fuel-rich to 8% excess oxygen), fuel-injection velocity, turndown, and flue-gas recirculation (5% and 10%) and furnace-wall temperature. The NOx levels decreased significantly with decreasing combustion-air preheat temperature, decreasing furnace-refractory temperature, and decreasing excess-oxygen levels below 5% to 6%. Above 5% to 6% oxygen, the NOx levels decreased with increasing oxygen levels. Though not as significant, NOx levels were also reduced by varying degrees at reduced firing rate, reduced fuel-injection velocity, and with flue-gas recirculation.