Chapter 12. Producibility of Fibrous Refractory Composite Insulation, FRCI 40–20

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. Eric L. Strauss,
  2. Clark W. Johnson,
  3. Ronald W. Graese and
  4. Ronnie L. Campbell

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320129.ch12

Proceedings of the 7th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 7th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Strauss, E. L., Johnson, C. W., Graese, R. W. and Campbell, R. L. (1983) Producibility of Fibrous Refractory Composite Insulation, FRCI 40–20, in Proceedings of the 7th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 7/8 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320129.ch12

Author Information

  1. Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace P.O. Box 179, Denver, CO 80201

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1983

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374030

Online ISBN: 9780470320129

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Keywords:

  • themal expansion;
  • cristobalite;
  • insulation;
  • capability;
  • deionized

Summary

Fibrous Refractory Composite Insulation (FRCI) is a NASA-developed, second-generation, reusable heat-shield material that comprises a mixture of alumlnoborosilicate fibers, silica fibers, and silicon carbide. Under NASA contract, Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace conducted a program to demonstrate capability for manufacturing FRCI 40–20 billets. A detailed fabrication procedure was written and validated by testing specimens from the first two billets. The material conformed to NASA requirements for density, tensile strength, modulus of rupture, thermal expansion, cristobalite content, and uniformity. Twenty-four billets were prepared to provide 20 deliverable articles. Production billets were checked for density, modulus of rupture, cristobalite content, and uniformity. Billet density ranged from 309.48 to 332.22 kg/m3 (19.32 to 20.74 lb/ ft3) and modulus of rupture from 4690 to 10 140 kPa (680 to 1470 psi). Cristobalite content was <1%. A Weibull analysis of modulus-of-rupture data indicated a 1.5% probability for failure below the specified strength of 4480 kPa (650 psi).