Chapter 14. Self-Propagating High Temperature Synthesis of Ceramics in Vacuum

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. William F. Henshaw,
  2. Andrus Nöler and
  3. Thomas Leete

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320129.ch14

Proceedings of the 7th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 7th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Henshaw, W. F., Nöler, A. and Leete, T. (1983) Self-Propagating High Temperature Synthesis of Ceramics in Vacuum, in Proceedings of the 7th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 7/8 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320129.ch14

Author Information

  1. Ballistic Research Lab, U.S. Army Armament Research and Development Command Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1983

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374030

Online ISBN: 9780470320129

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Keywords:

  • combustion;
  • utilizing;
  • exothermic;
  • exploration;
  • synthesizing

Summary

Numerous ceramics have been formed using a process catted self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS). This process involves an exothermic, self-sustaining reaction which propagates through a mixture of compressed powders. Propagation velocities are generally in the order of a few centimeters per second. Over 100 compounds, mostly the borldes, carbides, nitrides, and silicides of the transition metals, have reportedly been produced. Generally, the SHS process takes place at or greater than atmospheric pressure and is ignited by hot wires, thermites, or sparks. At the Ballistic Research Lab (BRL), the reaction takes place in a vacuum chamber at a pressure of 10000 to 100000 hPa (10000 to 100000 torr) and is ignited by an electron beam. The combustion processes are monitored and studied using high speed video analysis as well as optical spectroscopy. The ceramics formed by this process at BRL tend to be porous solids.