Chapter 17. Surface Chemistry, Friction, and Wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn Ferrites in Contact with Metals

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. Kazuhisa Miyoshi and
  2. Donald H. Buckley

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320129.ch17

Proceedings of the 7th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 7th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Miyoshi, K. and Buckley, D. H. (1983) Surface Chemistry, Friction, and Wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn Ferrites in Contact with Metals, in Proceedings of the 7th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 7/8 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320129.ch17

Author Information

  1. NASA-Lewis Research Center 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, OH 44135

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1983

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374030

Online ISBN: 9780470320129

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Keywords:

  • formation;
  • semiconductors;
  • abrasion;
  • polycrystalline

Summary

X-ray-photoelectron and Auger-electron-spectroscopy analyses were used in sliding-friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrys-tattine Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe2O4 were present on the Ni-Zn-ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn-ferrtte surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction far the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The absorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to the surfaces of the ferrites in sliding.