Chapter 3. Inorganic Modification of Glass Powder Surfaces for Improved Polymeric Composites

  1. William Smothers
  1. Cheng T. Lee,
  2. David E. Clark,
  3. Keith S. Shih and
  4. Charles L. Beatty

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320167.ch3

Proceedings of the 7th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 7th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Lee, C. T., Clark, D. E., Shih, K. S. and Beatty, C. L. (1983) Inorganic Modification of Glass Powder Surfaces for Improved Polymeric Composites, in Proceedings of the 7th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 4, Issue 9/10 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320167.ch3

Author Information

  1. University of Florida, Department of Materials Science and Engineering Gainesville, FL 32611

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1983

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374047

Online ISBN: 9780470320167

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Keywords:

  • treated;
  • significant;
  • spectroscopy;
  • composite;
  • proportions

Summary

Hydroxide or oxide surface films formed on 33L glass (33 mol% Li2O) treated with 1000 ppm AlCl3, MgCl2 or ZnCl2 solutions. Poly (styrene-co-n-butylmethacrylate) random copolymers containing 5 wt% styrene were mixed with both treated and untreated 33L glass powders. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements indicate that the surface area of the glass powders (∽30 μm in diameter) is increased up to 18 times by these surface treatments, which results in a significant increase in tensile properties of the composites. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy indicates an increase of the matrix polymer, T9, for composites formed from both treated and untreated glass powders. However, the increase in T2 of the composite was smaller at a fixed glass content for the treated powders. This is presumably due to poorer bonding of the polymer to oxide or hydroxide layers compared to the untreated glass surface. Thus, it appears that increased surface area dominates the increase in tensile stress-strain properties.