Chapter 13. Evaluation of NOx Emission on a Pilot-Scale Furnace

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. Hamid A. Abbasi,
  2. Mark J. Khinkis and
  3. Donald K. Fleming

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320198.ch13

Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 1/2

Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Abbasi, H. A., Khinkis, M. J. and Fleming, D. K. (1984) Evaluation of NOx Emission on a Pilot-Scale Furnace, in Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 1/2 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320198.ch13

Author Information

  1. Institute of Gas Technology 3424 S. State St., Chicago, IL 60616

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1984

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374061

Online ISBN: 9780470320198

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Keywords:

  • assess combustion modifications;
  • natural-gas-fired;
  • glassmelting furnaces;
  • eliminate natural gas;
  • thermal oxidation

Summary

An experimental program is underway to assess combustion modifications for control of NOx emissions from natural-gas-fired glassmelting furnaces. The program was undertaken by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT)for the Gas Research Institute (GRI), with the technical assistance of a glass industry advisory committee. The results of pilot-scale testing are described. The experiments were conducted on a pilot-scale glass furnace simulator using scaled flat-floor and inclined-floor melter ports. The furnace load consisted of a layer of molten glass over a series of refractory-covered heat exchangers. Operating conditions were adjusted to simulate those found in container glassmelters. Significant reductions in NOx emissions (compared to NOx at reference conditions of 45° angle firing and 40 m/s (120 ft/s) fuel-injection velocity) were achieved by (1) reducing fuel/air mixing rates by decreasing fuel and/or air velocity or changing burner angle or location, (2) burning the fuel with close-to-stoichiometric air and adding ambient secondary air downstream of the furnace exhaust gases, and (3) burning part of the fuel with very high excess air and adding the remaining fuel downstream of this primary combustion zone. Low NOx conditions, in most cases, did not increase the CO emissions or reduce the heat transfer to the glass.