Chapter 7. End-Port Charging—A Close Look at an Old Problem

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. Douglas H. Davis and
  2. David H. Davies

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320198.ch7

Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 1/2

Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Davis, D. H. and Davies, D. H. (2008) End-Port Charging—A Close Look at an Old Problem, in Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 1/2 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320198.ch7

Author Information

  1. FMC Corp. Box 8, Princton, NJ 08540

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1984

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374061

Online ISBN: 9780470320198

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Keywords:

  • glassmelter;
  • sidewall charging lends;
  • formidable challenge;
  • theoretical energy requirement;
  • circulating batch pattern

Summary

The design of an end-port glassmelter with sidewall charging lends itself to the establishment of a recirculating “wheel” batch pattern. This wheel pattern allows optimum use of the melting area and the best chance for the melting-out of batch residuals. This is important for high fuel efficiency and good glass quality. The key to maintaining this critical “wheel” pattern, however, is for the charged batch stream to consistently turn downtank at the opposite rear corner. Commonly, this is a problem. This paper will discuss a number of alternate designs and charging procedures that have been tried in the industry. Some of these are simple adjustments easily made on existing tanks.