Chapter 8. An Electric Furnace for Nuclear Waste Glass

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. Larry Penberthy

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320198.ch8

Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 1/2

Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Penberthy, L. (1984) An Electric Furnace for Nuclear Waste Glass, in Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 1/2 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320198.ch8

Author Information

  1. Foundation for Affordable Nuclear Waste Disposal 631 S. 96th St., Seattle, WA 98108

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1984

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374061

Online ISBN: 9780470320198

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Keywords:

  • electric furnace;
  • glassification;
  • nuclear;
  • plutonium;
  • uranium

Summary

A 5.4-tonne/d (6.0-ton/d) electric furnace was built by Penberthy Electromelt Co. for the Dept. of Energy to demonstrate the glassification of high level nuclear waste. A simplified process was developed to glassify all the waste at West Valley, NY, by mixing the content of the tanks with glassmaking ingredients and melting the mixture to form a highly durable, leach-resistant aluminosilicate glass. The mixture is delivered in slush form to the 3-m2 (35-ft2) melter via airlocked screw chargers. The molten glass passes through a riser and out an orifice into a canister. Water vapor and off-gas products pass through hot filters prior to scrubbing and release. The furnace melted 180 tonnes (200 tons) of glass at the rate of 5.4 tonne/d (6.0 ton/d) normally during a proving run. The furnace was physically destroyed after the test run.