Chapter 9. Use of High Iron Sand in Flint Container Glass

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. Harry N. Mills

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320198.ch9

Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 1/2

Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Mills, H. N. (1984) Use of High Iron Sand in Flint Container Glass, in Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 1/2 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320198.ch9

Author Information

  1. Owens-Illinois Inc., Glass Container Engineering & Research Glass Technology Section, Technical Center Toledo, OH 43666

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1984

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374061

Online ISBN: 9780470320198

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Keywords:

  • flint glass;
  • container glasses;
  • chromic oxide;
  • manufacture;
  • iron sands

Summary

The quantity of sand, containing >0.03% total iron as Fe2O3, usable in container flint glass is governed by two factors: (1) the total iron tolerable in the final glass for satisfactory flint color and (2) the contribution of iron from the other raw materials used to make the glass. Flint container glasses with >0.06% total Fe2O3 show deteriorating color characteristics in proportion to their iron content. Other factors limiting the quantity of high iron sand in container flint batch are: (1) contamination with small amounts of chromic oxide (Cr2O3) >10 ppm in the final glass and (2) production of so-called reduced flints with higher FeO/Fe2O3 ratios. Both chrome and ferrous iron impart more color to the glass. With current market requirements for flint color, the iron oxide content of sands used at the 100% level in flint batches would be limited to the 0.03% to 0.07% range.