Chapter 1. Why Ceramic Engines?

  1. William Smothers
  1. H. L. Stadler

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320211.ch1

Proceedings of the 12th Automative Materials Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 5/6

Proceedings of the 12th Automative Materials Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 5/6

How to Cite

Stadler, H. L. (2008) Why Ceramic Engines?, in Proceedings of the 12th Automative Materials Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, Issue 5/6 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320211.ch1

Author Information

  1. Jet Propulsion Lab, California Institute of Technology 4800 Oak Grove Dr. Pasadena, CA 91109

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1984

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374108

Online ISBN: 9780470320211

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Keywords:

  • freight;
  • engines;
  • gallon;
  • adiabatic;
  • turbines

Summary

Oil is still a problem for the U.S. and its allies. Transportation uses 61 % of US. oil and its share is increasing, so more efficient technology should be concentrated there. Trucks' share of oil use is increasing because they are already much more efficient than autos. The primary truck opportunities are streamlining, more efficient engines, and shifting freight to railroads. More efficient engines are possible using ceramics to allow elimination of cooling systems and better use of waste exhaust heat. A 60% improvement seems possible if ceramics can be made tough enough and durable enough.