Chapter 19. Fiber FP/Metal-Matrix Composites in Reciprocating Engines

  1. William Smothers
  1. Francisco Folgar1,
  2. William H. Krueger1 and
  3. James G. Goree2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320228.ch19

Proceedings of the 8th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, 7/8

Proceedings of the 8th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, 7/8

How to Cite

Folgar, F., Krueger, W. H. and Goree, J. G. (1984) Fiber FP/Metal-Matrix Composites in Reciprocating Engines, in Proceedings of the 8th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, 7/8 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320228.ch19

Author Information

  1. 1

    E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc. Pioneering Research Laboratory, Wilmington, DE 19898

  2. 2

    Department of Mechanical Engineering Clemson University, Clemson, SC

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1984

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374139

Online ISBN: 9780470320228

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Keywords:

  • fiber FP;
  • metal-matrix composites;
  • experimental cramic fiber;
  • titanium;
  • fatigue resistance

Summary

Fiber FP, an experimental aluminum oxide fiber under development at the Pioneer-ins Research Laboratory in Du Font's Textile Fibers Department, provides aluminum, magnesium, and lead castings with improved modulus, compressive strength, fatigue resistance, and increased temperature capability compared to the unreinforced metals. Fiber FP reinforced metal-matrix composites have potential as high performance components in aerospace and automotive applications. To assess the potential advantages of lightweight FP/metal in automotive applications, we have selected the reciprocating engine-connecting rod for evaluation and development. The connecting rod is one of the most severely stressed components in an engine and, under racing conditions, connecting-rod failure is a major constraint on increased engine output and reliability. A kinematic model has been developed to estimate the forces on the rods and to evaluate the benefits of lighter-weight engine components. A finite-element stress analysis was performed to ensure adequacy of rod design. FP/aluminum connecting rods, 35–50% lighter than incumbent steel rods, have been fabricated and show good performance in initial tests. Fiber FP/aluminum-connecting rods appear to be competitive in performance with incumbent materials, such as forged steel and titanium, and promise to provide a combination of improved fuel economy, higher engine speed, faster acceleration, and reduced noise and vibration.