Chapter 9. Development and Extension of Partially-Stabilized Zirconia Single Crystal Technology

  1. William Smothers
  1. R. W. Rice,
  2. R. P. Ingel,
  3. B. A. Bender,
  4. J. R. Spann and
  5. W. R. McDonough

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320228.ch9

Proceedings of the 8th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, 7/8

Proceedings of the 8th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, 7/8

How to Cite

Rice, R. W., Ingel, R. P., Bender, B. A., Spann, J. R. and McDonough, W. R. (1984) Development and Extension of Partially-Stabilized Zirconia Single Crystal Technology, in Proceedings of the 8th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 5, 7/8 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320228.ch9

Author Information

  1. Naval Research Laboratory Washington, D.C. 20375

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1984

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374139

Online ISBN: 9780470320228

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Keywords:

  • zirconia;
  • elastic anisotropy;
  • plasma-sprayed coatings;
  • electron diffraction;
  • x-ray peaks

Summary

Progress on, as well as the rationale for, various approaches to extend the practicality of PSZ crystals, as well as possibly using related melt processing to make improved polycrystalline PSZ materials are discussed. Neither laser welding, nor laser surface treatment of PSZ crystals has been particularly successful. While possible development and use of PSZ crystals from arc melting is complicated by reduction, promising crystals can be produced, but strengths after reoxidation have been limited, possibly due to enhanced precipitate growth. Crystals from induction melting have been successfully press-forged, and complications of stresses from reduction (and subsequent reoxidation) appear solvable. These results, and those from reduction studies of crystals from induction melting, suggest lower optimum Y2O3 contents to produce maximum strength in reduced PSZ. Finally, possible reasons, such as high elastic anisotropy are cited for the indicated significant lower PSZ strengths as grain size increases, and progress is reported on making PSZ particles by solidifying molten droplets, as a possible route to obtaining finer grain size precipitate-toughened PSZ polycrystals.