Chapter 11. Ceramic Matrix Composite Toughening Mechanisms: An Update

  1. William Smothers
  1. R. W. Rice

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320280.ch11

Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Rice, R. W. (1985) Ceramic Matrix Composite Toughening Mechanisms: An Update, in Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320280.ch11

Author Information

  1. Naval Research Lab Washington, DC 20375–5000

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1985

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374337

Online ISBN: 9780470320280

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Keywords:

  • crack deflection;
  • crack branching;
  • mechanical fatigue;
  • polymeric and metal matrix composites;
  • fibers and the matrix

Summary

A previous review of toughening mechanisms in ceramic matrix composites is updated. Evaluation of recent PSZ results indicates a single tetragonal phase (i.e., no precipitates) with a reversible transformation can give about 2/3 the toughening of that which occurs with irreversible transformation in normal two phase PSZ materials (i.e., with precipitates). Data is also presented to show that transformation is not the sole mechanism in PSZ; crack deflection is also indicated. Recent modeling of crack deflection and microcracking are summarized and combinations of these with branching are noted. Differences between fiber composites with ceramic vs polymer or metal matrices are outlined. The necessity of having a higher Young's modulus for fibers than for the ceramic matrices is questioned. Combined mechanisms in ceramic composites are also noted, and recent observations indicating the challenge of this are summarized. Needs for improved modeling, including issues of using whiskers, and of mechanical fatigue in ceramic composites are also discussed.