Chapter 16. Reinforcing Fused Silica with High Purity Fibers

  1. William Smothers
  1. F. P. Meyer,
  2. G. D. Quinn and
  3. J. C. Walck

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320280.ch16

Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Meyer, F. P., Quinn, G. D. and Walck, J. C. (2008) Reinforcing Fused Silica with High Purity Fibers, in Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320280.ch16

Author Information

  1. Ceramics Research Div. Army Materials and Mechanics Research Center Watertown, MA 02172–0001

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1985

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374337

Online ISBN: 9780470320280

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Keywords:

  • silica fibers;
  • fracture toughness;
  • low-modulus matrix;
  • fracture resistance;
  • fused silica matrix

Summary

Ceramic composites consisting of high-purity fused silica fibers dispersed in a high-purify fused silica matrix were successfully fabricated containing up to 10 vol% fibers. Short chopped fibers were employed and were randomly oriented in the matrix. Composite densities varied from 1.88 to 1.97 g/cc. Variations in Young's modulus were experienced because fibers were not evenly distributed throughout the matrix material. Single Edge Notch Beam tests indicated no effect of the fiber additions upon KIC. Work-of-fracture, as determined by triangular notched-beam tests, showed a dramatic increase due to the fiber additions, particularly for 2.5 and 75 vol%. Maximum break loads (SENB) were similar for fiber-reinforced vs monolithic fused silica, but the work required to push a controlled crack (WOF) through a specimen was appreciably greater for the reinforced material. Indeed, In some instances in the SENB tests for the fiber reinforced specimens after maximum load was achieved, the crack did not always propagate entirely through the specimen. Rocket-sled rain erosion testing of the fiber-reinforced fused silica materials indicated approximately a ten percent reduction in the mass-loss ratio, calculated as the ratio of mass loss in the specimen to the mass of rain encountered In the rainfield. Composite samples experienced rather severe erosion, but they did not crack catastrophically as did some unreinforced fused silica samples under Identical test conditions. The erosion of the composite samples was more uniform around the sample surface than that for monolithic fused silica. These results tend to support the fracture toughness results.