Chapter 45. Fundamental Tribological Properties of Ceramics

  1. William Smothers
  1. Donald H. Buckley and
  2. Kazuhisa Miyoshi

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320280.ch45

Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Buckley, D. H. and Miyoshi, K. (1985) Fundamental Tribological Properties of Ceramics, in Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320280.ch45

Author Information

  1. NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland, OH 44315

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1985

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374337

Online ISBN: 9780470320280

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Keywords:

  • ceramic;
  • sliding;
  • rubbing contact;
  • adhesion;
  • electronic

Summary

When a ceramic is brought into contact with itself, or another ceramic, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness, and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and itself, or another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to the interface resulting from solid-state contact. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid-state contact are discussed as they relate to friction and wear. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic, and relate to crystal structure as with metals. Grit size effects in two- and three-body abrasive wear are observed for ceramics. Both free energy of oxide formation, and the d-valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Surface contaminants affect friction and adhesive wear. For example, carbon on silicon carbide, and hydrogen on aluminum oxide, reduce friction, while oxygen on metal surfaces in contact with ceramics, increase friction. Lubrication is found to increase the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics with sliding or rubbing contact.