Chapter 46. Micromechanics of Microstructural Aspects of Ceramic Wear

  1. William Smothers
  1. Roy W. Rice

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320280.ch46

Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Rice, R. W. (1985) Micromechanics of Microstructural Aspects of Ceramic Wear, in Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320280.ch46

Author Information

  1. Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1985

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374337

Online ISBN: 9780470320280

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Keywords:

  • micromechanics;
  • microstructure;
  • dimensions;
  • ceramic;
  • thermal expansion

Summary

While continuum, i.e., microstructure-average, isotropic behavior is applicable to some ceramic wear, e.g., where one or more dimensions (e.g., asperity size) is large in comparison with the micrastructure, it may be quite inaccurate when such dimensions are on a scale comparable to, or less than, the microstructure. In such cases, locally enhanced stresses from pores and those due to elastic and thermal expansion differences and basic crystalline anisotropies may become important. This paper summarizes how these enhanced stresses, plastic deformation, cracking, and microstructure may interact to produce many of the complexities of wear behavior. Thus, for example, besides the direct effects of grain and pore structure on wear, the scale of local wear contacts may play a role in determining the specifics of how pores and grains affect wear of ceramics. Possible effects of grain and pore structure on chemical effects in wear are also suggested.