Chapter 53. Wear and Related Evaluations of Partially Stabilized ZrO2

  1. William Smothers
  1. R. W. Rice and
  2. C. Cm. Wu

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320280.ch53

Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Rice, R. W. and Wu, C. Cm. (1985) Wear and Related Evaluations of Partially Stabilized ZrO2, in Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 7/8 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320280.ch53

Author Information

  1. Naval Research Lab Washington, DC 20375–5000

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1985

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374337

Online ISBN: 9780470320280

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Keywords:

  • POD;
  • PSZ;
  • stabilizer;
  • pin-on-disk;
  • microcracking

Summary

Pin-on-disk (POD) testa show partially stabilized ZrO2 (PSZ) crystals to have about the same wear as fully stabilized ZrO2 crystals until stabilizer contents are low enough (e.g., 4–5 wt % Y2O3) so that some monoclinic ZrO2 is present. Then wear increases substantially as stabilizer content is further reduced, and monoclinic content increases. Tests of PSZ-crystal cutting tools have not proved particuarly successful, and rolling-contact fatigue tests of various PSZ materials showed them to be poor candidates for rolling-element bearings, with the latter results indicating a Petch-type dependence. Possible reasons for such limited or poor performance of PSZ, despite its good toughness, are discussed. Poor performance with concentrated loads is noted in particular, indicating limitations due to plastic flow.