Chapter 17. High-Purity, Fine Ceramic Powders Produced in the Bureau of Mines Turbomill

  1. William Smothers
  1. Jesse L. Hoyer and
  2. Arthur V. Petty Jr

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320297.ch17

Proceedings of the Conference on Raw Materials for Advanced and Engineered Ceramics: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the Conference on Raw Materials for Advanced and Engineered Ceramics: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Hoyer, J. L. and Petty, A. V. (2008) High-Purity, Fine Ceramic Powders Produced in the Bureau of Mines Turbomill, in Proceedings of the Conference on Raw Materials for Advanced and Engineered Ceramics: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 9/10 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320297.ch17

Author Information

  1. Tuscaloosa Research Center, Bureau of Mines US Dept. of the Interior University, AL 35486

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1985

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374368

Online ISBN: 9780470320297

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Keywords:

  • ultrafine;
  • turbomill;
  • agglomeration;
  • ultra-high;
  • scanning electron microscopy

Summary

The Bureau of Mines turbomill is being evaluated for the production ofultrafine9 high-purify, ceramic powders. Such highly reactive ceramic powders could contribute to improved performance of structural materials fabricated for use in severe conditions of temperature, pressure, and environment The materials studied were alpha-silicon carbide (α-SiC), silicon nitride (Si3N4)f titanium diboride (TiB2), quartz (SiO2), alumina (Al2O3), and zirconia (ZrO2). The agglomeration characteristics of α-SiC and the effects of dispersing agents on agglomeration also were evaluated. Ultrafine α-SiC powders with an average diametenof 1.31 μm (51 pet <1 μm) were produced in 1 h in the Bureau's all-polymer turbomill. A sodium lignosulfonate was found to be the best dispersant for SiC powders, resulting in the least agglomeration and in negligible contamination from the milling process. Si3N4 powders were prepared from two different starting materials, each with a diameter of 55 μm. Milled powders had average particle sizes of 2.96 μm (20 pet <1 pm) after 1 h in the one case, and 2.09 μm (51 pet < 1 pm) after 2 h in the other. TiB2, with an average initial diameter of 35 μm, was reduced to 5.52 μm (2 pet < 1 pm) in 1 h. SiO2, ZrO2, and A12O3 (starting materials with average diameters of 30.52, 20.11, and 101. 74 μm) were ground to 3.44 μm (12 pet < 1 μm), 3.09 μm (15 pet < 1 μm), and 2.69 μm (28 pet < 1 μm), respectively, in 1 h. Contamination of the powders produced in the turbomill was negligible, which is advantageous for high-temperature applications where purity is a primary concern.