Chapter 2. Synergistic Process Control

  1. William Smothers
  1. Philip A. Partington

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320303.ch2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 86th and 87th Annual Meetings and the 1984 and 1985 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 11/12

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 86th and 87th Annual Meetings and the 1984 and 1985 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 11/12

How to Cite

Partington, P. A. (1985) Synergistic Process Control, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 86th and 87th Annual Meetings and the 1984 and 1985 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 6, Issue 11/12 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320303.ch2

Author Information

  1. K. N. Myers & Co. 4 Penhurst Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15202

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1985

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374405

Online ISBN: 9780470320303

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Keywords:

  • statistical monitoring;
  • process control program;
  • communication feedback;
  • quality control

Summary

A process control program that works is something many businesses can't afford to do without, yet do not have. A well-planned process control program reduces rejects, improves productivity and raises quality levels. Planning and implementing process control programs is a complex, time consuming and highly specialized task. Consistent quality success is not achieved by statistical process control, analytic trouble shooting teams, quality circles nor other participative management alone. Consistent quality success is only achieved when these concepts are linked to the value of the individual worker.