Chapter 5. Zircon Processing

  1. William Smothers
  1. K. K. Cheang

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320310.ch5

Applications of Refractories: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 1/2

Applications of Refractories: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Cheang, K. K. (2008) Zircon Processing, in Applications of Refractories: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 1/2 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320310.ch5

Author Information

  1. Science University of Malaysia Minden, Penang, Malaysia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374443

Online ISBN: 9780470320310

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Keywords:

  • refractory mineral;
  • tin-mining operations;
  • gravel-pump mining;
  • concentrates;
  • vicinity

Summary

Zircon (ZrSiO4), a highly refractory mineral, is found in relatively great abundances in the alluvium of the Kinta Valley, the largest tin-mining area in the world. Most of the zircon is found associated with cassiterite, ilmenite, monazite, xenotime, struverite, rutile, garnet, and quartz obtained as a by-product of the tin-mining operations. These “impure” mineral dumps are of no economical significance unless they can be separated into their indiuidual physical components. A plowsheet is presented to show the processes required to produce a fairly high grade (Ω97%) zircon concentrate which conforms to market specifications and hence, can contribute to the nation's development and wealth. A combination of several processing techniques including classification, gravity stream-flowing, high tension, and magnetic methods are considered to be more efficient in obtaining a high quality product. This flowsheet is not only applicable to the Kinta Valley area, but also to other regions in Malaysia and Southeast Asia.