Chapter 3. Improvement of Glass Furnace Efficiency by Reduction of Regenerator Infiltration

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. Ronald T. Myers and
  2. Charles J. Stanley

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320327.ch3

Proceedings of the 46th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 3/4

Proceedings of the 46th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 3/4

How to Cite

Myers, R. T. and Stanley, C. J. (1986) Improvement of Glass Furnace Efficiency by Reduction of Regenerator Infiltration, in Proceedings of the 46th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 3/4 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320327.ch3

Author Information

  1. Brockway Inc. Brockway, PA 15824

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374658

Online ISBN: 9780470320327

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Keywords:

  • glass furnace efficiency;
  • regenerator infiltration;
  • operating temperatures;
  • air flow;
  • wall permeability

Summary

Infiltration of cold air through the regenerator walls can increase the fuel consumption of a glass furnace by as much as 5%. This is particularly evident after the regenerator chamber walls have been cooled, promoting the formation of cracks, which increases the infiltration rate. The rate of infiltration can be reduced, and furnace efficiency improved, by applying low-permeability coatings to the outside face of the insulating brick. A laboratory method to measure the permeability of refractory brick and refractory brick coatings has been developed to determine the effectiveness of prospective coatings. This method has been used to screen commercially available coatings. An improvement in furnace efficiency was observed when the optimum coating was applied to the regenerator walls of a production furnace.