Chapter 8. Sonic Energy as a Means to Reduce Energy Consumption During Glass Melting

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. Emilio D. Spinosa and
  2. Dale E. Ensminger

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320327.ch8

Proceedings of the 46th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 3/4

Proceedings of the 46th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 3/4

How to Cite

Spinosa, E. D. and Ensminger, D. E. (1986) Sonic Energy as a Means to Reduce Energy Consumption During Glass Melting, in Proceedings of the 46th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 3/4 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320327.ch8

Author Information

  1. Battelle Columbus Div. 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201–2693

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374658

Online ISBN: 9780470320327

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Keywords:

  • sonic energy;
  • molten glass;
  • glass melting;
  • energy requirements;
  • energy consumption

Summary

A majority of the energy delivered to the melting and molten glass bath in an industrial melter is used to refine glass (i.e., remove bubbles). If the bubbles in the melt can be made to coalesce, so that their rate of rise will increase, then this energy consumption requirement can be reduced. Introduction of sonic energy into the melt can induce such coalescence, thereby reducing energy requirements for refining. The viscous fluid modeling data indicate that bubble coalescence does occur and that it can contribute to a 15 to 20% improvement in glass throughput rate, thereby accomplishing an energy reduction per pound of melter output. Initial estimates indicate that implementation of sonic refining is both technically practical and economically attractive, but such implementation requires further development of this technology.