Chapter 1. Some Aspects of the High Temperature Performance of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. A. G. Evans and
  2. B. J. Dalgleish

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320358.ch1

Proceedings of the 13th Automotive Materials Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 13th Automotive Materials Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Evans, A. G. and Dalgleish, B. J. (1986) Some Aspects of the High Temperature Performance of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites, in Proceedings of the 13th Automotive Materials Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 9/10 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320358.ch1

Author Information

  1. College of Engineering, Univ. California Santa Barbara, CA 93106

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374689

Online ISBN: 9780470320358

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Keywords:

  • high temperature performance;
  • ceramics;
  • creep ductility;
  • stress corrosion;
  • ceramic composites

Summary

Ceramics and ceramic composites are subject to creep rupture at elevated temperatures. The rupture strain in such materials has been shown to exhibit a major transition, from creep brittleness to creep ductility. The emphasis of the present article is on the definition of microstructures that provide ductility. For this purpose, the fundamental principles involved in high temperature flow and fracture are reviewed, and physical models of the ductile-to-brittle transition are presented. The mechanical phenomena involved in these considerations include: creep crack growth, crack blunting, flaw nucleation, and stress corrosion.