Chapter 1. Rate-Controlled Sintering of a Whiteware Porcelain

  1. William Smothers
  1. Hayne Palmour III

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320365.ch1

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 11/12

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 11/12

How to Cite

Palmour, H. (1986) Rate-Controlled Sintering of a Whiteware Porcelain, in Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 11/12 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320365.ch1

Author Information

  1. Dept. Materials Engrg. North Carolina State Univ. Raleigh, NC 27695

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374696

Online ISBN: 9780470320365

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Keywords:

  • densification;
  • utilized;
  • computerized;
  • resultant;
  • optimizations

Summary

The sintering kinetics of an artware porcelain body have been investigated by precision digital dilatometry. Such a material is traditional and generally familiar, yet it is in fact rather complex, both mineralogically and morphologically. During densification, the kinetics responses displayed over the whole field of sintering interest are also complex. Using a flexible method (based upon multi-zoned, nonlinear regression techniques), the kinetics field response for a particular porcelain body has now been empirically but successsfully modeled for the whole sintering regime (0.68<D<0.94). With such a model and a newly developed microcomputer-based design capability (CADOPS) which greatly facilitates the precise use of established rate controlled sintering (RCS) concepts for optimization of the path of morphological change, firing schedules for porcelains and other complex ceramic materials can be efficiently designed, evaluated, even experimentally verified. All steps of the process are now carried out entirely within the digitally precise microcomputer environment. In this study, these new methods have been employed to characterize the sintering behavior of a particular artware porcelain body (used for making hand-formed shapes), and to confirm experimentally the near-optimal character of its densification path, which had been designed on the basis of only four dilatometric experiments. Thereafter, the CADOPS-designed sintering path, which requires only about eight h cold-to-cold, was carried out with full digital precision under computer control (expressed as a succession of heating-rate-to-target-temperature segments), in accomplishing a series of highly reproducible firings of small underglaze decorated porcelain shapes. In comparison to other commonly used firing schedules, these computer-designed, computer-controlled RCS firings resulted in very attractive ware which displayed improved translucency as well as freedom from microcracks surrounding the coarser residual quartz grains.