Chapter 11. Environmental and Health Aspects of Glass Furnace Repairs

  1. William Smothers
  1. Bradley Q. Kinsman and
  2. John L. Cherill

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320365.ch11

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 11/12

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 11/12

How to Cite

Kinsman, B. Q. and Cherill, J. L. (1986) Environmental and Health Aspects of Glass Furnace Repairs, in Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 7, Issue 11/12 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320365.ch11

Author Information

  1. Corning Glass Works, Houghton Park Corning, NY 14831

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374696

Online ISBN: 9780470320365

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Keywords:

  • hazardous;
  • innovative;
  • adequately;
  • leachability;
  • connector-riser

Summary

Concerns about respirable dust during glass furnace repairs have led to extensive measurements of hazardous dust levels attendant to repair work, in particular during the demolition phase. Respirable dust levels exceed OSHA permissible exposure limits for various materials. Extensive and costly personal protection programs for workers are required as well as innovative work practices. Data is presented from various furnace repairs completed during the fourth quarter of 1985 and early 1986. A method for sampling furnace demolition wastes is presented together with a new sample preparation procedure which has been accepted by the authorities. The new procedures more adequately define the safety or hazardousness of materials removed from various portions of the glass furnace.