Chapter 6. The Effects of Long-Term Heating on the Thermal Shock Properties of Basic Refractories

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. Donald J. Griffin1 and
  2. Thomas G. Miller2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320372.ch6

Application of Refractories: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 8, Issue 1/2

Application of Refractories: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 8, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Griffin, D. J. and Miller, T. G. (1987) The Effects of Long-Term Heating on the Thermal Shock Properties of Basic Refractories, in Application of Refractories: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 8, Issue 1/2 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320372.ch6

Author Information

  1. 1

    J. E. Baker Company Box 1189, York, PA 17405

  2. 2

    Dolomite Brick Corp. Box 2028, York, PA 17405

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1987

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374702

Online ISBN: 9780470320372

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Keywords:

  • long-term heating;
  • refractories;
  • thermal shock properties;
  • magnesla;
  • heat treatment

Summary

Basic brick used in rotary cement kiln applications are sometimes exposed to temperatures considerably higher than the kilns are normally operated. When conditions of overheating occur, the thermal shock properties of the brick can be severely affected due to changes in the physical structure and properties of the brick. The effects of long-term heat treatment at 1538°C (2800°F) on the thermal shock properties for various basic brick were determined. Brick tested were two dolomite transition-zone brick, a direct-bonded 60% mag-chrome, two conventionally bonded 80% mag-chrome, and a magnesia spinel brick. Each type of brick was fired to 1S38°C (2800°F) and held for 100 h. After firing, the bricks were cycled at 1038°C (1900°F). After cooling, the modulus of rupture (MOR) of the shocked half was determined and compared to the unshocked MOR. The percent retained strength ranged from 30% to 80% for the various bricks. The higher values were associated with samples with lower strengths resulting from the heat treatment.