Chapter 3. Silicon Resonant Microsensors

  1. William Smothers
  1. Martin A. Schmidt and
  2. Roger T. Howe

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470320419.ch3

14th Automotive Materials Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 8, Issue 9/10

14th Automotive Materials Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 8, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Schmidt, M. A. and Howe, R. T. (1987) Silicon Resonant Microsensors, in 14th Automotive Materials Conference: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 8, Issue 9/10 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470320419.ch3

Author Information

  1. Microsystems Technology Labs Dept. Electrical Eng. and Computer Sci. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1987

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374740

Online ISBN: 9780470320419

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Keywords:

  • microfabrication;
  • spurious;
  • piezoelectric;
  • polycrystalline;
  • microbridge

Summary

Mechanically resonant structures are sensitive transducers of signals that alter the kinetic or potential energy of vibration. This paper reviews the design issues for this class of sensor and evaluates the potential for silicon resonant microsensors fabricated using planar microfabrication technology. We first apply Rayleigh's Energy Method to determine the resonant frequencies of selected microstructures. Insight into resonant sensor design is gained through perturbing the expressions for kinetic or potential energy, making Rayleigh's Method an important design tool. We apply this technique to compare the sensitivities of surface-acoustic-wave and resonant microbridge vapor sensors and to evaluate the resonant diaphragm and axially loaded vibrating beam structures for force or pressure sensing. Finally, the challenges for developing a silicon resonant microsensor technology are outlined, including questions of excitation and detection, material properties, fabrication and structural constraints, and packaging.