2c. Heterocyclic Aromatic Amines

  1. Richard H. Stadler2 and
  2. David R. Lineback3
  1. Robert J. Turesky

Published Online: 11 JUL 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470430101.ch2c

Process-Induced Food Toxicants: Occurrence, Formation, Mitigation, and Health Risks

Process-Induced Food Toxicants: Occurrence, Formation, Mitigation, and Health Risks

How to Cite

Turesky, R. J. (2008) Heterocyclic Aromatic Amines, in Process-Induced Food Toxicants: Occurrence, Formation, Mitigation, and Health Risks (eds R. H. Stadler and D. R. Lineback), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470430101.ch2c

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Nestlé Product Technology Centre Orbe, CH-1350 Orbe, Switzerland

  2. 3

    Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (JIFSAN), University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA

Author Information

  1. Division of Environmental Disease Prevention, Wadsworth Center, NYS Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 11 JUL 2008
  2. Published Print: 19 DEC 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470074756

Online ISBN: 9780470430101

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Keywords:

  • heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs)-diet hazardous chemicals;
  • HAAs in cooked meats, fish, and poultry;
  • HAAs metabolism and implementation

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Mechanisms of HAA Formation

  • Endogenous Formation of Novel HAAs

  • Analytical Methods to Measure HAA

  • HAAs in Cooked Meats, Fish, and Poultry

  • HAAs in Pan - Residue Scrapings, Processed Flavorings, and Commercial Meat Products

  • Conditions and Factors that Can be Used to Reduce The Formation of HAAs in Cooked Meat

  • Bacterial Mutagenesis Assays, In Vivo Short-Term Assays, and Carcinogenesis of HAAs

  • Metabolism of HAAs and Implementation of HAA Biomarkers in Epidemiology Studies

  • Health Risks of HAAs and Uncertainties in Assessment

  • Future Prospects on Research of HAAs in Human Health Risk

  • References