Effects of Chronically Administered Antidepressants and Electroconvulsive Treatment on Cerebral Neurotransmitter Receptors in Rodents with ‘Model Depression’

  1. Ruth Porter Organizer,
  2. Gregory Bock Organizer and
  3. Sarah Clark
  1. Jerzy Vetulani,
  2. Lucyna Antkiewicz-Michaluk,
  3. Anna Rokoszpelc and
  4. Jerzy Michaluk

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470513361.ch13

Ciba Foundation Symposium 123 - Antidepressants and Receptor Function

Ciba Foundation Symposium 123 - Antidepressants and Receptor Function

How to Cite

Vetulani, J., Antkiewicz-Michaluk, L., Rokoszpelc, A. and Michaluk, J. (2007) Effects of Chronically Administered Antidepressants and Electroconvulsive Treatment on Cerebral Neurotransmitter Receptors in Rodents with ‘Model Depression’, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 123 - Antidepressants and Receptor Function (eds R. Porter, G. Bock and S. Clark), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470513361.ch13

Author Information

  1. Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 12 Smetna Street, 31–343 Cracow, Poland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471910893

Online ISBN: 9780470513361

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Keywords:

  • antidepressants;
  • electroconvulsive treatment;
  • cerebral neurotransmitter receptors;
  • rodents;
  • model depression

Summary

The aim of this study was to develop a model of depression in laboratory animals in which chronically administered antidepressant drugs and electroconvulsive treatment (ECT) would produce receptor effects similar to but more marked than those in normal animals. The models discussed in detail are reserpinized and centrally chemosympathectomized rats. Other models currently under investigation are albino Swiss mice that respond with motor inhibition to high doses of morphine and rats tolerant to morphine. The reserpine model seems to be of some value, because in reserpinized rats antidepressants and ECT lead to adrenoceptor changes the same as or more marked than those observed in normal animals. Central chemosympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine prevents several receptor actions of imipramine, though not of ECT. The ‘opiate models’, though apparently not very promising, need further study.