Cytoskeletal Abnormalities in Long-Term Embryonic CNS Transplants Isolated within Peripheral Nerve

  1. Gregory Bock Organizer and
  2. Maeve O'Connor
  1. Laurie C. Doering and
  2. Albert J. Aguayo

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470513422.ch10

Ciba Foundation Symposium 126 - Selective Neuronal Death

Ciba Foundation Symposium 126 - Selective Neuronal Death

How to Cite

Doering, L. C. and Aguayo, A. J. (2007) Cytoskeletal Abnormalities in Long-Term Embryonic CNS Transplants Isolated within Peripheral Nerve, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 126 - Selective Neuronal Death (eds G. Bock and M. O'Connor), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470513422.ch10

Author Information

  1. The Neuroscience Unit, Montreal General Hospital Research Institute and McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3G 1A4, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471910923

Online ISBN: 9780470513422

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Keywords:

  • cytoskeletal abnormalities;
  • embryonic CNS transplants;
  • peripheral nerve;
  • PNS grafts;
  • Eagle's minimal essential medium

Summary

Cells from the fetal central nervous system (CNS) of rat embryos survive and differentiate when transplanted into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) of adult rats. The experiments described here were aimed at investigating selected molecular and ultrastructural features of dissociated CNS cells from the telencephalon of 12-day-old embryos isolated for long periods of time within PNS segments. Neurons and glia of grafts examined 6–12 months after transplantation into the PNS developed several cytoskeletal abnormalities. In neurons, these changes included Hirano bodies within dendrites and a marked perikaryal immunoreactivity to RT97, a monoclonal antibody that normally recognizes in neuronal processes the phosphorylated 200 kDa protein subunit of neurofilaments. Rosenthal fibres were seen within the glial cells. Similar-looking abnormalities have been described in certain human and animal neurodegenerative diseases and in ageing. Although a relationship between the changes in these long-term neural transplants and such diseases is unknown, these observations provide an opportunity for studying their pathogenesis within laboratory conditions.