Developmental Regulation of Prion Protein mRNA in Brain

  1. Greg Bock Organizer and
  2. Joan Marsh
  1. Michael P. Mckinley1,2,
  2. Vishwanath R. Lingappa3 and
  3. Stanley B. Prusiner1,4

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470513613.ch7

Ciba Foundation Symposium 135 - Novel Infectious Agents and the Central Nervous System

Ciba Foundation Symposium 135 - Novel Infectious Agents and the Central Nervous System

How to Cite

Mckinley, M. P., Lingappa, V. R. and Prusiner, S. B. (2007) Developmental Regulation of Prion Protein mRNA in Brain, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 135 - Novel Infectious Agents and the Central Nervous System (eds G. Bock and J. Marsh), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470513613.ch7

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA

  3. 3

    Department of Physiology and Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471915126

Online ISBN: 9780470513613

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Keywords:

  • developmental regulation;
  • prion protein mRNA;
  • brain;
  • cellular isoform identification;
  • oligonucleotides

Summary

During development of the hamster brain, synthesis of the cellular isoform of the scrapie prion protein (PrPC) was found to be regulated. Low levels of PrP poly(A)+ mRNA were detectable one day after birth. PrP poly(A)+ mRNA reached maximal levels between 10 and 20 days post-partum; thereafter, no change in its level could be detected at ages up to 13 months. In contrast, myelin basic protein poly(A)+ mRNA was shown to reach maximal levels by 30 days of age and thereafter steadily declined in adult brain. Using monospecific PrP antisera, immunoprecipitable cell-free translation products were detected at low levels two days after birth and progressively increased up to 10 days of age. How the PrP mRNA participates in brain development and its function in scrapie prion infection are being investigated.