Conventional and New Approaches to Hyposensitization

  1. Derek J. Chadwick Organizer,
  2. David Evered Organizer and
  3. Julie Whelan
  1. Alain L. de Weck

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470513866.ch15

Ciba Foundation Symposium 147 - IgE, Mast Cells and the Allergic Response

Ciba Foundation Symposium 147 - IgE, Mast Cells and the Allergic Response

How to Cite

de Weck, A. L. (2007) Conventional and New Approaches to Hyposensitization, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 147 - IgE, Mast Cells and the Allergic Response (eds D. J. Chadwick, D. Evered and J. Whelan), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470513866.ch15

Author Information

  1. Institute of Clinical Immunology, University of Bern, Inselspital, Bern, Switzerland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471923091

Online ISBN: 9780470513866

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Keywords:

  • hyposensitization;
  • immunotherapy;
  • effector cells;
  • monocytes;
  • low affinity receptors

Summary

Hyposensitization in IgE-mediated allergic diseases has traditionally been induced by immunotherapy in which increasing amounts of allergens have been injected until a maximal tolerated dose has been achieved. Among the most obvious immunological effects of immunotherapy have been the production of allergen-specific IgG and some impairment in the synthesis of allergen-specific IgE. In addition to allergen-specific IgG (sometimes described as blocking antibodies) anti-idiotypic and anti-isotypic (IgG anti-IgE) have recently attracted attention as possibly being involved in hyposensitization. The effects of immunotherapy at the cellular level (either as T cell control of IgE synthesis or as modulation of mediator release by effector cells) also deserve further investigation.