Gene Transfer Methods for Plants and Cell Cultures

  1. Derek J. Chadwick Organizer Director and
  2. Joan Marsh
  1. Ingo Potrykus

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470514009.ch14

Ciba Foundation Symposium 154 - Bioactive Compounds from Plants

Ciba Foundation Symposium 154 - Bioactive Compounds from Plants

How to Cite

Potrykus, I. (2007) Gene Transfer Methods for Plants and Cell Cultures, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 154 - Bioactive Compounds from Plants (eds D. J. Chadwick and J. Marsh), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470514009.ch14

Author Information

  1. Institute for Plant Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), ETH-Zentrum, LFW-E59.1 CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471926917

Online ISBN: 9780470514009

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Keywords:

  • gene transfer;
  • plant culture;
  • animal culture;
  • pollen transformation;
  • transgenic cells

Summary

Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer provides a routine and efficient gene transfer system for a variety of plant species. As this biological vector does not, however, function with important plant species, numerous alternative approaches have been studied. Of those, direct gene transfer into protoplasts, microinjection and biolistics have been demonstrated to be effective. Others, for example, viral vectors, agroinfection, liposome injection and electrophoresis may have special merits, although transgenic plants have not been produced by these techniques yet. From methods based on pollen transformation, the pollen tube pathway, pollen maturation, incubation of dry seeds, incubation of tissues, liposome fusion with tissues, macroinjection, laser treatment and electroporation of tissues no proof of integrative transformation is available, so far, and it is difficult to envisage how these approaches will ever produce transgenic cells and plants. We discuss (a) why Agrobacterium does not function with all plants, (b) what merits and disadvantages we see for the effective methods, (c) what possibilities we foresee for some of the other approaches, and (d) why we do not expect the remaining ones to be successful.