Consciousness, Schizophrenia and Scientific Theory

  1. Gregory R. Bock Organizer and
  2. Joan Marsh
  1. Jeffrey A. Gray

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470514412.ch13

Ciba Foundation Symposium 174 - Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness

Ciba Foundation Symposium 174 - Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness

How to Cite

Gray, J. A. (2007) Consciousness, Schizophrenia and Scientific Theory, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 174 - Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness (eds G. R. Bock and J. Marsh), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470514412.ch13

Author Information

  1. Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471938668

Online ISBN: 9780470514412

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Keywords:

  • consciousness;
  • schizophrenia;
  • scientific theory;
  • neuropsychology;
  • cognitive impairment

Summary

The positive symptoms of acute schizophrenia are, of their very nature, aberrations of conscious experience. A recent theory of the mechanisms underlying their occurrence spans four levels: neuroanatomical, neurochemical, cognitive and the symptoms themselves. The theory is capable of being tested in animals and human subjects, and it has passed a number of experimental tests at both levels with success. Implications of the theory for the scientific treatment of consciousness are considered. Although the theory permits useful questions relating to consciousness to be put and even to some extent to be answered, it leaves the most basic issue—the theoretical link between the occurrence of conscious experience and the neural substrate of the brain—unresolved, as do all similar theories so far.