The Relationship between Early Giftedness and Later Achievement

  1. Gregory R. Bock Organizer and
  2. Kate Ackrill
  1. Howard Gardner

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470514498.ch11

Ciba Foundation Symposium 178 - The Origins and Development of High Ability

Ciba Foundation Symposium 178 - The Origins and Development of High Ability

How to Cite

Gardner, H. (2007) The Relationship between Early Giftedness and Later Achievement, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 178 - The Origins and Development of High Ability (eds G. R. Bock and K. Ackrill), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470514498.ch11

Author Information

  1. The Development Group, Harvard Project Zero, Harvard University Graduate School of Education, 323 Longfellow Hall, Appian Way, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471939450

Online ISBN: 9780470514498

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Keywords:

  • early giftedness;
  • later achievement;
  • multiple intelligences;
  • creative personality;
  • child prodigy

Summary

Although some prodigies grow up to become creative masters as adults, there is no necessary link between early signs of talent and ultimate achievement. Four possible relations between early and late achievement are explored here. The analysis draws upon two lines of evidence: (1) a new theoretical approach that posits the existence of multiple intelligences and examines the important role of the domains and fields in which individuals work; (2) case studies of seven highly creative individuals who lived at the turn of the century. A strong contrast emerges between the adult creator, who must discover the domain in which he or she can excel and the child prodigy, who must invent a creative personality.