Second Messenger Signalling in Olfaction

  1. Derek Chadwick Organizer,
  2. Joan Marsh Organizer and
  3. Jamie Goode
  1. Heinz Breer

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470514511.ch7

Ciba Foundation Symposium 179 - The Molecular Basis of Smell and Taste Transduction

Ciba Foundation Symposium 179 - The Molecular Basis of Smell and Taste Transduction

How to Cite

Breer, H. (2007) Second Messenger Signalling in Olfaction, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 179 - The Molecular Basis of Smell and Taste Transduction (eds D. Chadwick, J. Marsh and J. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470514511.ch7

Author Information

  1. Institut für Zoophysiologie, Universität Hohenheim (230), Postfach 70 05 62, D-7000 Stuttgart 70, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471939467

Online ISBN: 9780470514511

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Keywords:

  • second messenger signalling;
  • olfaction;
  • phosphorylation;
  • olfactory receptor neurons;
  • receptor proteins

Summary

Odorous molecules are recognized by specific receptor proteins located in the ciliary membrane of olfactory receptor neurons. These receptors have been identified using molecular cloning—they are members of the seven-transmembrane-domain G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Specific receptor subtypes are expressed in subsets of olfactory neurons spatially segregated within certain areas of the olfactory epithelium. Interaction of odorants with receptors initiates the primary reaction of olfactory signalling. Intracellular reaction cascades are activated via specific G proteins, leading to a rapid and transient rise in second messenger levels; odorous compounds elicit mutually exclusive cAMP or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate responses. Odorant-induced second messenger signalling is terminated via kinase-mediated negative feedback loops uncoupling the reaction cascades by phosphorylation of receptor proteins. Strong odour stimuli elicit a delayed response of another messenger system, the nitric oxide/cGMP cascade. cGMP may control some adaptive reactions in olfactory receptor neurons.