Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Present MHC Class I-Restricted Tumour Antigens in Priming of Antitumour Immune Responses

  1. Derek J. Chadwick Organizer and
  2. Joan Marsh
  1. Alex Y. C. Huang,
  2. Paul Golumbek,
  3. Mojgan Ahmadzadeh,
  4. Elizabeth Jaffe,
  5. Drew Pardoll and
  6. Hyam Levitsky

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470514672.ch15

Ciba Foundation Symposium 187 - Vaccines Against Virally Induced Cancers

Ciba Foundation Symposium 187 - Vaccines Against Virally Induced Cancers

How to Cite

Huang, A. Y. C., Golumbek, P., Ahmadzadeh, M., Jaffe, E., Pardoll, D. and Levitsky, H. (2007) Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Present MHC Class I-Restricted Tumour Antigens in Priming of Antitumour Immune Responses, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 187 - Vaccines Against Virally Induced Cancers (eds D. J. Chadwick and J. Marsh), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470514672.ch15

Author Information

  1. Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 720 Rutland Avenue, 364 Ross Building, Baltimore, MD 21205-2196, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471950264

Online ISBN: 9780470514672

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • bone marrow-derived cells;
  • tumour antigens;
  • antitumour immune responses;
  • allogeneic tumour vaccines;
  • antigen presentation

Summary

Many tumours express tumour-specific antigens capable of being presented to CD8+ T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Current models of antigen presentation predict that the tumour cell itself should present its own MHC class I-restricted antigens to T cells. Earlier cross-priming experiments have demonstrated that at least some MHC class I-restricted antigens may also be presented by bystander cells. There is no detectable presentation of MHC class I-restricted tumour antigens by the tumour itself during priming of tumour-specific responses. The tumour antigens are presented exclusively by host bone marrow-derived cells. These results imply that an efficient mechanism exists in vivo for transfer of MHC I-restricted antigens to bone marrow-derived antigen presenting cells. They also suggest that HLA matching may not be critical in the clinical application of allogeneic tumour vaccines.