Vaccination Against Cutaneous and Mucosal Papillomavirus in Cattle

  1. Derek J. Chadwick Organizer and
  2. Joan Marsh
  1. M. Saveria Campo1 and
  2. William F. H. Jarrett2

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470514672.ch5

Ciba Foundation Symposium 187 - Vaccines Against Virally Induced Cancers

Ciba Foundation Symposium 187 - Vaccines Against Virally Induced Cancers

How to Cite

Campo, M. S. and Jarrett, W. F. H. (2007) Vaccination Against Cutaneous and Mucosal Papillomavirus in Cattle, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 187 - Vaccines Against Virally Induced Cancers (eds D. J. Chadwick and J. Marsh), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470514672.ch5

Author Information

  1. 1

    Wolfson Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 IBD, UK

  2. 2

    Department of Veterinary Pathology, Glasgow University Veterinary School, Garscube Estate, Glasgow G61 1QH, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471950264

Online ISBN: 9780470514672

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Keywords:

  • vaccination;
  • mucosal papillomavirus;
  • cutaneous papillomavirus;
  • cottontail rabbit papillomavirus.;
  • cattle

Summary

Viruses are responsible for approximately 15% of human cancer worldwide. Human papillomavirus and hepatitis B virus are the recognized agents of cervical and liver cancer, respectively, which together constitute 80% of all virally induced cancers. If measures could be found to bring viral infection under control, a great proportion of human cancer would be greatly reduced. Experimental vaccines are being developed against papillomavirus. In principle two different types of vaccine can be envisaged: prophylactic vaccines that would elicit virus-neutralizing antibodies and would prevent infection and therapeutic vaccines that would induce regression of established lesions before progression to malignancy took place. The research on vaccines against human papillomavirus is hampered by the difficulties encountered in growing the virus in tissue culture and by the unacceptable nature of experimentation in humans. Effective vaccines, both natural and genetically engineered, have been developed against bovine papillomavirus and cottontail rabbit papillomavirus. The success obtained with the animal models supports the optimistic prediction that in the relatively near future vaccines will be available against the most problematic or potentially dangerous forms of papillomatosis in humans.