Plasticity in the Development of Neocortical Areas

  1. Gregory R. Bock Organizer and
  2. Gail Cardew
  1. Dennis D. M. O'Leary1,
  2. Douglass J. Borngasser1,
  3. Kevin Fox2 and
  4. Bradley L. Schlaggar1

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470514795.ch11

Ciba Foundation Symposium 193 - Development of the Cerebral Cortex

Ciba Foundation Symposium 193 - Development of the Cerebral Cortex

How to Cite

O'Leary, D. D. M., Borngasser, D. J., Fox, K. and Schlaggar, B. L. (2007) Plasticity in the Development of Neocortical Areas, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 193 - Development of the Cerebral Cortex (eds G. R. Bock and G. Cardew), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470514795.ch11

Author Information

  1. 1

    Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, The Salk Institute, 10010 N Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Physiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471957058

Online ISBN: 9780470514795

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Keywords:

  • plasticity;
  • neocortical areas;
  • thalamocortical afferent terminations;
  • thalamocortical axons;
  • adult neocortex

Summary

Heterotopic transplantation analysis suggests that individual areas of the developing neocortex have the capacity to differentiate many of the architectural and connectional features normally characteristic of other neocortical areas. Many studies indicate a pivotal role for thalamocortical afferents in the differentiation of the area-specific features that distinguish neocortical areas. Both activity-dependent and activity-independent mechanisms contribute to the patterning of thalamocortical afferent terminations. The available evidence suggests that positional information is established in the cortical subplate and that this information controls the precise targeting of developing thalamocortical axons. In this way appropriate thalamocortical relationships can be established that allow these afferents to promote the differentiation of the functionally specialized and anatomically distinct areas of the adult neocortex.