Pathology of Cortical Development and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

  1. Gregory R. Bock Organizer and
  2. Gail Cardew
  1. G. W. Roberts1,
  2. M. C. Royston2 and
  3. M. Götz1

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470514795.ch15

Ciba Foundation Symposium 193 - Development of the Cerebral Cortex

Ciba Foundation Symposium 193 - Development of the Cerebral Cortex

How to Cite

Roberts, G. W., Royston, M. C. and Götz, M. (2007) Pathology of Cortical Development and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 193 - Development of the Cerebral Cortex (eds G. R. Bock and G. Cardew), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470514795.ch15

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Molecular Neuropathology, SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, New Frontiers Science Park, Harlow, Essex CM19 5AW

  2. 2

    Departments of Psychiatry & Anatomy, Charing Cross & Westminster Medical School, St Dunstan's Road, London W6 8RP, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471957058

Online ISBN: 9780470514795

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Keywords:

  • pathology;
  • cortical development;
  • neuropsychiatric disorders;
  • schizophrenia;
  • structural abnormalities

Summary

Epilepsy is a well-documented consequence of about 150 rare genetic syndromes and malformations of the central nervous system. These syndromes are generally associated with fairly gross defects within the central nervous system and they were thought to be responsible for a small minority of cases. However, improved methods of neuropathological investigations and extensive magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed a range of disturbances in cortical cytoarchitecture in patients with epileptic seizures previously considered as idiopathic (up to 70% of epilepsy). Structural abnormalities have also been demonstrated in the brain in schizophrenia. These consist of disturbed cortical cytoarchitecture (best described in the temporal lobe) and a diffuse loss of grey matter. The absence of the pathological stigma characteristic of degenerative processes indicates that these structural changes are the result of an abnormal pattern of brain development. The relationship between the type and location of developmental abnormality and the subsequent clinical syndrome (e.g. generalized or localized epilepsy) and the effects of aberrant cortical development on the functional integrity of the adult brain require definition.