Effects of Neurotrophins on the Survival and Regrowth of Injured Retinal Neurons

  1. Gregory R. Bock Organizer and
  2. Jamie A. Goode
  1. A. J. Aguayo,
  2. D. B. Clarke,
  3. T. N. Jelsma,
  4. P. Kittlerova,
  5. H. C. Hyman Friedman and
  6. G. M. Bray

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470514863.ch10

Ciba Foundation Symposium 196 - Growth Factors as Drugs for Neurological and Sensory Disorders

Ciba Foundation Symposium 196 - Growth Factors as Drugs for Neurological and Sensory Disorders

How to Cite

Aguayo, A. J., Clarke, D. B., Jelsma, T. N., Kittlerova, P., Friedman, H. C. H. and Bray, G. M. (2007) Effects of Neurotrophins on the Survival and Regrowth of Injured Retinal Neurons, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 196 - Growth Factors as Drugs for Neurological and Sensory Disorders (eds G. R. Bock and J. A. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470514863.ch10

Author Information

  1. Center for Research in Neuroscience, Montreal General Hospital Research Institute and McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Canada H3G 1A4

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471957218

Online ISBN: 9780470514863

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Keywords:

  • neurotrophins;
  • injured retinal neurons regrowth;
  • retinal ganglion cells;
  • apoptotic cell death;
  • axotomy

Summary

The focus of this short review is the role of certain neurotrophins and their receptors on the survival and regrowth of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) whose axons are damaged in the optic nerve. Initial experiments in our laboratory documented patterns of RGC death after axotomy. Subsequent studies were designed to investigate the distribution of high-affinity neurotrophin receptors in neurons and glial cells of the retina and optic nerve. This information was used both in vitro and in vivo to study the effects of specific trophic molecules on the survival and regrowth of injured RGCs. During the course of experiments involving neurotrophin administration, an endogenous source of trophic support—independent of the exogenous administration of growth factors—was found within the eye. Several experiments were subsequently undertaken to define further this survival effect and determine its nature and source within the eye. Finally, anatomical techniques that help visualize fine axonal processes within the retina have provided insights into the specific effects of neurotrophins on the growth and branching of injured CNS axons.