Growth Factors in the Treatment of Degenerative Retinal Disorders

  1. Gregory R. Bock Organizer and
  2. Jamie A. Goode
  1. Thomas A. Reh1,
  2. Kathryn McCabe1,
  3. Matthew W. Kelley1 and
  4. Olivia Bermingham-McDonogh2

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470514863.ch9

Ciba Foundation Symposium 196 - Growth Factors as Drugs for Neurological and Sensory Disorders

Ciba Foundation Symposium 196 - Growth Factors as Drugs for Neurological and Sensory Disorders

How to Cite

Reh, T. A., McCabe, K., Kelley, M. W. and Bermingham-McDonogh, O. (2007) Growth Factors in the Treatment of Degenerative Retinal Disorders, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 196 - Growth Factors as Drugs for Neurological and Sensory Disorders (eds G. R. Bock and J. A. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470514863.ch9

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Biological Structure, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA

  2. 2

    Cambridge NeuroSciences, One Kendall Square, Building 700, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471957218

Online ISBN: 9780470514863

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Keywords:

  • degenerative retinal disorders;
  • pigmented epithelium;
  • retinal progenitor cells;
  • retinal degeneration treatment;
  • epidermal growth factor

Summary

There are currently a number of degenerative conditions, both inherited and acquired, that affect the retina and lead to blindness. Retinal photoreceptors degenerate from inherited conditions, such as retinitis pigmentosa or as a result of light damage or normal ageing; retinal ganglion cells degenerate from optic nerve injury or glaucoma. Current research in this field includes the use of growth factors to: (1) inhibit the degenerative processes; (2) promote regeneration of the retina from the pigmented epithelium; and (3) improve the conditions for transplantation of new cells to the retina by expanding the photoreceptor cell populations in vitro. The results to date have shown that a number of different growth factors promote survival of retinal cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, some of the same factors can stimulate regeneration in the developing retina and act as mitogens for the retinal progenitor cells. It is likely that a combination of these approaches will ultimately be important for the treatment of the various retinal degenerations.