P2 Purinoceptors: Historical Perspective and Classification

  1. Derek J. Chadwick Organizer and
  2. Jamie A. Goode
  1. Geoffrey Burnstock Chairman

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470514900.ch1

Ciba Foundation Symposium 198 - P2 Purinoceptors: Localization, Function and Transduction Mechanisms

Ciba Foundation Symposium 198 - P2 Purinoceptors: Localization, Function and Transduction Mechanisms

How to Cite

Burnstock, G. (2007) P2 Purinoceptors: Historical Perspective and Classification, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 198 - P2 Purinoceptors: Localization, Function and Transduction Mechanisms (eds D. J. Chadwick and J. A. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470514900.ch1

Author Information

  1. Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471961253

Online ISBN: 9780470514900

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Keywords:

  • P2 purinoceptor;
  • G protein-coupled receptors;
  • noncholinergic (NANC) nerves;
  • endothelial cells;
  • vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)

Summary

This article presents an overview that gives some historical perspective to the detailed papers at the cutting edge of P2 purinoceptor research that follow. I consider the proposal, first put forward by Abbracchio & Burnstock (Pharmacol Ther 64:445–475, 1994), that P2 purinoceptors should be regarded as members of two main families: a P2X purinoceptor family consisting of ligand-gated ion channels, and a P2Y purinoceptor family consisting of G protein-coupled receptors. The latest subclasses of these two families (P2X1–4, and P2Y1–5), identified largely on the basis of molecular cloning and expression, are tabled. Finally, I suggest some future directions for P2 purinoceptor research, including studies of the long-term (trophic) actions of purines, the evolution and development of purinoceptors and therapeutic applications.