P2 Purinoceptors in the Immune System

  1. Derek J. Chadwick Organizer and
  2. Jamie A. Goode
  1. Francesco Di Virgilio1,
  2. Davide Ferrari1,
  3. Simonetta Falzoni1,
  4. Paola Chiozzi1,
  5. Maddalena Munerati1,
  6. Thomas H. Steinberg2 and
  7. Olavio R. Baricordi3

Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470514900.ch17

Ciba Foundation Symposium 198 - P2 Purinoceptors: Localization, Function and Transduction Mechanisms

Ciba Foundation Symposium 198 - P2 Purinoceptors: Localization, Function and Transduction Mechanisms

How to Cite

Di Virgilio, F., Ferrari, D., Falzoni, S., Chiozzi, P., Munerati, M., Steinberg, T. H. and Baricordi, O. R. (2007) P2 Purinoceptors in the Immune System, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 198 - P2 Purinoceptors: Localization, Function and Transduction Mechanisms (eds D. J. Chadwick and J. A. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470514900.ch17

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of General Pathology, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Via L Borsari 46, I-44100 Ferrara, Italy

  2. 2

    Institute of General Medical Genetics, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Via L Borsari 46, I-44100 Ferrara, Italy

  3. 3

    Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471961253

Online ISBN: 9780470514900

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Keywords:

  • P2 purinoceptors;
  • G protein-linked metabotropic receptors;
  • ionotropic receptor;
  • purine nucleotides;
  • nucleosides

Summary

Immune cells express plasma membrane receptors for extracellular nucleotides. Both G protein-linked metabotropic and channel-forming ionotropic receptors have been described, although no P2 receptor subtype has been cloned from the immune system thus far. Metabotropic receptors have been described in human B but not T lymphocytes; they have not been found in mouse B and T cells. lonotropic receptors seem to be ubiquitously expressed in the immune system; however, their functional properties, if not their pharmacology, appear to be different in different immune cells. Human T normal and B leukaemic lymphocytes, human macrophages, mouse B and T lymphocytes, mouse microglial and macrophage cells, and rat mast cells express ionotropic receptors that recognize ATP4− as the preferred ligand, are activated by 3′-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl ATP and inhibited by oxidized ATP. The pharmacological profile of ionotropic receptors expressed by different immune cells is similar, but their permeability properties may be different: the pore formed by receptors expressed by macrophages, microglial cells and mast cells is typically permeable to charged molecules of molecular mass up to 900 Da; on the contrary, that expressed by lymphocytes has a molecular cut-off of 200–300 Da. The ionotropic receptor of immune cells is modulated by inflammatory cytokines (e.g. interleukin [IL]-2 and γ-interferon) and is also modulated during monocyte to macrophage differentiation. Transient stimulation of the ionotropic receptor of macrophages and microglial cells elicits IL-1β release. Sustained activation leads to cell death, either by necrosis or apoptosis, depending on the given cell type.