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Self-Assembly of Coordination Cages and Spheres

Self-Processes

  1. Sota Sato,
  2. Takashi Murase,
  3. Makoto Fujita

Published Online: 15 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9780470661345.smc078

Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials

Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials

How to Cite

Sato, S., Murase, T. and Fujita, M. 2012. Self-Assembly of Coordination Cages and Spheres. Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials. .

Author Information

  1. The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 MAR 2012

Abstract

Self-assembly employing coordination bonds provides symmetric, huge, hollow cages and spheres that are not attained by conventional synthetic methodologies based on covalent bonds. The self-assembled architectures are not merely aesthetically attractive; they offer fruitful functions, which otherwise cannot be realized in normal bulk conditions. For example, self-assembled host cages serve as nanometer-sized molecular flasks where cavity-directed chemical transformations are performed and as nanometer-sized sealed chamber where reactive species are stabilized. The shell frameworks of hollow spherical complexes are versatile scaffolds for precisely accumulating functional groups outside/inside the spheres where the functional groups work cooperatively and thus new functions emerge. Therefore, the chemistry of coordination cages and spheres will further expand the skeleton toward much more large, complex systems; and the implanted functions through elaborated molecular designs will afford creative innovations based on the well-defined structures.

Keywords:

  • self-assembly;
  • coordination bonds;
  • cage compounds;
  • Host–guest chemistry;
  • cavity-directed reactions;
  • functionalized spheres