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Functions Based on Dynamic Structural Changes of Coordination Polymers

Soft Matter

  1. Mitsuru Kondo

Published Online: 15 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9780470661345.smc133

Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials

Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials

How to Cite

Kondo, M. 2012. Functions Based on Dynamic Structural Changes of Coordination Polymers. Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials. .

Author Information

  1. Shizuoka University, Shizuoka, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 MAR 2012

Abstract

The unique functions of flexible coordination polymers (FCPs) based on the dynamic structural changes are described. Coordination polymers with flexible structures have been classified into four types in this review. Type I shows reversible interconversions between porous and nonporous frameworks in response to removals and reinclusions of guest molecules from/into the channels. FCPs that exhibit Type I structural changes are general. Type II FCPs show reversible switches between the porous and nonporous frameworks depending on the guest molecules. The two-dimensional coordination polymers that show reversible structural changes in response to the present solvents have been presented as examples of Type II FCPs. Type III FCPs involve the creation of vacant channels for additional guest molecules from nonporous compounds, which is triggered by chemical stimuli. The hydrogen bond-assembled metal complex has been shown as an example of Tpye III materials. Type IV FCPs have the channel structures that show reversible transformations depending on the physical stimuli. Type III and IV FCPs are rare and unique. Adsorption of EtOH guest molecules induced by the addition of CH3OH, which is a smaller guest molecule, is demonstrated. Mechanical trapping of guest molecules in the closed channels induced by physical stimuli is presented as FCPs demonstrating Type IV structural changes.

Keywords:

  • coordination polymer;
  • flexible coordination frameworks;
  • dynamic channels;
  • porous framework;
  • chemical stimuli;
  • physical stimuli;
  • structural conversion;
  • metal–organic frameworks;
  • crystal structure;
  • mechanical trapping