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Self-Organization and Self-Assembly in Liquid-Crystalline Materials

Soft Matter

  1. John W. Goodby,
  2. Isabel M. Saez,
  3. Stephen J. Cowling

Published Online: 15 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9780470661345.smc148

Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials

Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials

How to Cite

Goodby, J. W., Saez, I. M. and Cowling, S. J. 2012. Self-Organization and Self-Assembly in Liquid-Crystalline Materials. Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials. .

Author Information

  1. University of York, York, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 MAR 2012

Abstract

Liquid crystals comprise a number of thermodynamically stable states, which occur between the melting of a material and the formation of an amorphous liquid. Liquid crystals are the quintessential molecular materials of the modern era, being found in many types of display device, from watches and calculators to laptop computers and TVs, in high yield strength polymeric materials such as Kevlar®, and in soft materials such as soaps and detergents. Control of the self-organizing and self-assembling properties of liquid crystals makes these applications possible. In the following text, we describe many types of interactions at various levels of molecular complexity in the formation and stabilization of liquid crystal mesophases. The discussion ranges from covalently bound materials through to ionic- and charge-transfer systems, and from molecular materials to super- and supramolecular systems.

Keywords:

  • liquid crystals;
  • soft matter;
  • self-assembly;
  • self-organization;
  • H-bonding;
  • dendrimers;
  • chromonics;
  • charge-transfer complexes